Prevent insurance  disaster
Hire our Insurance Claim Specialists

You suffered a natural disaster, now don't suffer from insurance disaster. Hire Insurance Claim 911 for your property insurance attorneys and licensed general contractors to help with rebuilding your life.

God Bless all who suffered a Natural Disaster.  

 Experienced Attorneys Adjusters Lawyers are here to file home and business insurance claims on your behalf. 

NO CHARGE to you, everything is paid by insurance contingency!

                          Please know that you are not considered a client until your case has been accepted by an attorney and you have signed a formal "retainer agreement."

When you have an insurance claim, you don't have to accept just what the insurance company offers. Insurance companies employ trained adjusters and it is in their best interest to do so. It is in your best interest to employ an ATTORNEY to represent you. The sole purpose of an ATTORNEY is to make sure you get a fair settlement on your insurance claim. Below is a short list of services that a Licensed ATTORNEY would provide to maximize the return on your claim.

We will personally help you :

  • Evaluate restoration costs from your damage.
  • Evaluate construction and engineering costs on any scale.
  • Discuss the loss with you in a way that is straight forward and easy to understand.
  • Obtaining affidavits and any other necessary documents.
  • Take Photographs and/or video tape the loss.
  • Engage the services of structural & geotechnical engineers, architects, designers, or other specialists.
  • Test for hazardous materials like asbestos, lead paint, mold, and other foreign materials.
  • Preparing the claim from top to bottom which will reduce the time, effort, and stress involved in settling your claim.
  • Submitting the claim and related forms and paperwork.
  • Managing the entire claim process from initial evaluation to receiving your settlement from the insurance company.

For residentialcommercialindustrial or retail losses, there is no claim too small or too large. Fees are based only on the amount you recover. If there is no recovery, there is no fee.


Simple & Easy Insurance Claim Form

All submissions will be verified with a call from an
Information Collection Associate
. 

Before contacting our property insurance attorneys for insurance claim help, you must do the following to file for bad faith insurance help:

a)  Give prompt notice of loss to your insurance company. You can do this by phone, in writing, or in person. And keep a record of all communications with your insurer.

b)  Show proof of property ownership and damage and be able to document what you lost and what it was worth.

 

Five Things Your Insurance Company May Not Tell You - 

a)  If you need to stay at a hotel and / or buy food because your home is not fit to live in due to the hurricane, your insurer should reimburse you.

b)  Removal of trees and other debris may be paid for by your insurer.

c)  If someone elses tree did damage to your home or property, your insurance should cover the cost of repair.

d)  Damage to your car should be covered by your auto insurance.

e)  If you replace any damaged property – such as your TV, computer, DVD player, etc. – your insurer should pay for the full cost of replacement.

 

Report your loss promptly to your agent or the insurance company.

  • Take pictures of the damage to the home and to its contents.
  • Start making a list of items that were in your home that cannot be found or were destroyed.
  • Keep all receipts for hurricane related expenses.
  • Find your Homeowner’s Insurance Policy or request a copy from your agent or insurance company.
  • Keep written records of any contact with your insurance company, the adjuster or the agent.
  • Save all paperwork you receive from your insurance company, the adjuster or the agent.
  • Return home only after the authorities advise you that it is safe to do so.

 

Avoid loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to the Power Company, police, or fire department.

  • Enter your home with caution. Beware of snakes, insects, and animals driven to higher ground by flood water.
  • Open windows and doors to ventilate and dry your home.
  • Check refrigerated foods for spoilage.
  • Drive only if absolutely necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed-out bridges.
  • Use telephone only for emergency calls.
  • If you smell gas or hear a hissing noise, open a window, quickly leave and call the gas company.
  • If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires turn off the electricity at the main breaker.
  • If you have to step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker, call an electrician first.
  • Check for sewage and water line damage. If you suspect damage avoid using the toilets and call a plumber.
  • If water pipes are damaged, contact the water company and avoid the water from the tap.
  • Boil water before using or obtain safe water by melting existing ice cubes.
             

Simple & Easy Insurance Claim Form


Insurance Questions

 

Q: Should I begin repairing damages myself, or should I wait for the adjuster first?
A: Make whatever temporary repairs you can. Cover broken windows, damaged roofs and walls to prevent further destruction. Also save the receipts for supplies and materials you buy to give copies to your insurance company. It will reimburse you for reasonable expenses.

Q: What should I do next?
A: Get a detailed estimate for permanent repairs to your home from a reliable contractor and give it to the adjuster. The estimate should contain the proposed repairs, repair costs and replacement prices.

Q: What proof do I need to replace my normal household goods, such as TVs, DVD and furniture?
A: As for ordinary business items like furniture and fixtures there is coverage but it will go easier if you have receipts or proof of what you had before the hurricane. You likely won't get an argument if you say you had a few computers or types of machinery, but if you try to claim that you just had your entire store redone last month with top-of-the-line fixtures, be prepared to provide receipts or documentation from your suppliers.

Q: How do I get reimbursed for items like jewelry, artwork, furs and antiques?
A: Problems can arise when the claim is for unusual items like jewelry, artwork, furs, and antiques without receipts or documentation. You should have separate insurance riders for expensive items, and appraisals for unique or valuable items such as works of art. Receipts and appraisal documentation belong in your safe deposit box.

Other FAQ's - 

Q: Does the contractor who fixes my home need workers' compensation insurance?
A: Yes. If a worker is injured on your property you may be liable for his injuries if the contractor doesn't have workers' compensation insurance.

Q: The public adjuster who I hired to adjust my claim because I thought the insurance estimate was too low asked me for money up front. Can he do that?
A: No. There was an order issued after the hurricane that no up front money may be charged and the cap on adjusting fees is 10% of the total recovery.

Q: My mortgage company never paid my homeowners' insurance and now I don't have coverage. What do I do?
A: Under a new law the mortgage company is responsible for any damage to your property that would have been covered by your insurance. Also, all costs and fees to reinstate the insurance have to be paid by the mortgage company if the insurer sent notice of the payment due.

Q: How much insurance coverage should I have?
A: If you live anywhere near water you should consider obtaining flood coverage (even if you are not required to carry it).  Know that you can obtain “excess” flood coverage beyond the $250,000 primary flood policy often sold by insurance agents.  You should carry enough flood coverage and enough windstorm coverage to rebuild your home in the event either peril alone causes its destruction.  So, for example, if rebuild costs (not market value, but cost of rebuild under the new codes) would be $275,000, you should carry at least $275,000 in flood coverage and $275,000 in wind coverage.

       What Does My Homeowners' Insurance Cover? - 

HomeownersÂ’ Insurance can be different for every home but the basic coverage's are:

  • Coverage A – Dwelling (Home)
  • Coverage B – Other Structures (Garage, Pool Screen)
  • Coverage C – Personal Property (Furniture, Clothes, Electronics)
  • Coverage D – Alternative Living Expenses / Loss of Use (Living Elsewhere While Home is Fixed)

While each insurer calculates the coverage's differently the value of the house itself is usually 80%-90% of the appraised market value. The “Other Structures” is usually 10%-20% of the house value. The “Personal Property” value is usually 40%-60% of the house value and the “Alternative Living Expense / Loss of Use” is 10%-20% of the house value.

For example, if the appraised market value for the house is $100,000, then the dwelling coverage is $80,000 to $90,000 to fix or replace the home. The Other Structures coverage would be between $8,000 to $18,000 to repair a detached garage, pool screen, or shed. Personal Property coverage would be between $32,000 to $54,000 for belongings inside the home or in the other structures. Alternative Living Expenses / Loss of Use coverage would be $8,000 to $18,000. These amounts are the maximum that would be paid by the insurance company for your loss.

If your home is damaged or destroyed and the damage is covered under your homeowner's insurance, you may have to live elsewhere while your home is being repaired. In that case, you're likely to incur additional living expenses. If you're renting out a room in your house and sustain insured damages to your home, additional-living-expense coverage often pays for the loss of rental income. However, this coverage is limited to the reasonable amount of time it would take for the residence premises to be repaired or, if relocating, a reasonable amount of time for the insured to become settled at a new location. This portion of the loss of use coverage is generally referred to as additional living expense or ALE.

In order for there to be coverage for additional living expense, there must be a covered loss to the residence premises which causes it to be uninhabitable. As such, coverage related to additional living expense is generally very straightforward when attempting to determine its applicability. Therefore, there has been very little in the way of litigation which is directly related to additional living expense coverage. In other words, if there is coverage for building damage, there is generally going to be coverage for a claim related to additional living expense related to that particular loss for a reasonable amount of time. On the other hand, if coverage is denied for the building claim, there will generally be no additional living expense coverage.

You may also consider purchasing additional coverage for traditionally non-covered items such as fences.

                 Hurricane Insurance Basics - 

Homeowners’, mobile homeowners’ and renters’ insurance usually covers the following: wind damage; rain damage that is a result of rain entering through a wind-damaged area; theft; vandalism and fire. If these damages occur, the insurance pays for emergency repairs to prevent further damage; additional living expenses; debris removal; actual cash value or replacement value of the damaged property, depending on the policy.

Flood insurance is sold separately, but usually in conjunction with homeowners’, mobile homeowners’ and renters’ insurance. It covers damage by these types of water: waves; tidal action; overflowing rivers, creeks or lakes; and groundwater runoff. Also covered by flood insurance are repair or replacement of damaged or destroyed buildings; compensation for damaged or destroyed personal property at its actual cash value; and debris removal.

Cars damaged by hurricanes are usually covered by the comprehensive section of an auto insurance policy.

Please know that you are not considered a client until your case has been accepted by an attorney and you have signed a formal "retainer agreement."



A word to our Florida Real Estate Agents about helping those of storm damage.

Dear Florida Real Estate Agents,

We hope you are getting your lives back together and are safe and sound of mind.  Thousands of our fellow Floridians are still in need of help, whether it be with their living situation or future work prospects.  Most of Floridians will be filing insurance claims; and some will indeed, need legal representation with their disaster insurance claims. As a licensed Realtor, your clients are what matters most. Helping them to sell their property and possibly retain legal representation to work on their insurance claim needs, should be an utmost priority.  Please recommend your clients to use www.InsuranceClaim911.com  

Our team of experienced information gatherers collect your clients’ damage information and discuss with our attorneys on what they can do with their Florida damaged property.  We will decide together if there is an issue with their insurance filing and offer them “contingency paid” legal representation on their insurance claim.  

Currently we have 47 registered Florida licensed attorneys, representing 42 counties in Florida.  Insurance Claim 911 is here to help you connect with licensed attorneys, adjusters, and general contractors to process claims. Even more, as a Florida Licensed Realtor, representing your client as their agent, you can quicken the claims process by contacting a Florida licensed general contractor at your client’s property and get an accurate estimate of damages.  Submit that estimate with the owner's name and file number and Insurance Claim 911 will take care of the rest of the insurance claim process.

Insurance Claim 911 is operated by American Community Training Services, "ACTS", with a Florida BAR Licensee.  As your clients’ Realtor, please contact the property owner and counsel them about their property, the insurance coverage options and inform them about attorney representation.  Owner of property is the only person to execute the actions of our insurance claim response team.  In the meantime, schedule a site visit with a licensed General Contractor to your client’s property.  Get an estimate of both rebuild and or replacement value.  Submit all info via email or zip file to info@insuranceclaim911.com

We will go from there; trying to make this whole process simple and less painful than it should be!

If you have not already done so, please refer your client to sign up by clicking the link below. http://www.insuranceclaim911.com. There is no charge for participating in our service!


Thank you!

Paul Cook

For residential, commercial, industrial or retail losses, there is no claim too small or too large. Fees are based only on the amount you recover. If there is no recovery, there is no fee.

                                                          

Simple & Easy Insurance Claim Form

                       

                          

Disclaimer and Terms of Use






You suffered a natural disaster, now don't suffer from insurance disaster. Hire Insurance Claim 911 for your property insurance attorneys and licensed general contractors to help with rebuilding your life.

Insurance » Hurricanes Tornados » Will Your Home Insurance Take On A Wind Storm, Natural Disaster, Hurricane or Tornado?

It seems to appear out of nowhere and is gone within minutes, but in that short time a tornado can devastate a home. The vital question is: Can your home insurance withstand its winds?


About 1,000 tornadoes touch down in the U.S. in an average year, causing billions of dollars in insured losses, according to the Insurance Information Institute. Last year, these monster storms -- which can wipe out whole neighborhoods and small towns -- were the costliest type of natural disaster in the country for insurers, according to Munich Re, a company that insures insurance companies.

Here are five steps for assessing your insurance needs in the face of tornadoes.

1. Know your coverage

Unlike floods or earthquakes, tornadoes don't require a special type of insurance. A basic homeowners policy should cover the damage inflicted by a tornado, whether it's from wind or rain, says Christopher Hackett, director of personal lines policy at the Property Casualty Insurers Association of America.

Still, homeowners concerned about tornadoes should make sure their policies match their financial needs, he says.

For example, a policy with a higher deductible likely will translate into lower premiums, but you will end up paying more out of your own pocket if a tornado damages or destroys your house, Hackett says. Make sure you can cover the deductible. Otherwise, consider a higher premium with a smaller deductible.

It's also important to know if you have a replacement cost policy, which replaces the damage to the home with materials that are similar in quality and kind. The alternative is a cash-value policy, which accounts for depreciation and probably won't pay as much, Hackett says.


2. Take inventory

Of course, homeowners insurance covers more than just the structure. The policies cover what's on the inside, too.

If your insurance replaced "just a home (but) no bed, it's not a home," notes Jim Whittle, the assistant general counsel and chief claims counsel at the American Insurance Association.

Make a list of what you have, to ensure your possessions are covered adequately. Include brand names, when you bought each item and approximately how much you paid. Include receipts when possible, especially for more expensive belongings such as electronics and appliances.

Create a photo log of your possessions or record what you have on video. A detailed list will help you determine how much coverage you need and make it easier to file a claim after a tornado.

Store these records in a secure place, such as a safe deposit box at a bank or in a lock box in whatever room you designate as your safe room.

3. Consider your valuables and car

Your home insurance will cover personal property up to a limit. If you own valuable items such as stamp or coin collections, fine art, expensive photography equipment or jewelry, consider a rider on your policy to increase coverage, Hackett recommends. These items may require an appraisal before a rider is granted.

If your car is damaged while parked in the garage, it may or may not be covered by homeowners insurance, says Whittle. Still, the comprehensive portion of an auto policy should take care of any damage from a tornado's wind or hail, and cover your vehicle against flooding, vandalism, and theft during or after a storm, he says. (A cautionary note: Not all states require comprehensive coverage for auto insurance, so make sure you have it.)

4. Don't forget about living expenses

Another consideration is where your family is going to live and how you will eat while your home is being repaired (or rebuilt) after a tornado. Instead of crashing on a friend's couch in the basement, check if your homeowners insurance will pay for additional living expenses, Hackett says.

This type of coverage helps cover the cost of staying in a hotel or paying rent for temporary housing. It can even cover meal expenses while your family is displaced.

5. What to do in the aftermath

After making sure your family is safe, get in touch with your insurer. You should have contact information for your homeowners insurance company and agent in a safe place with your inventory of possessions.

Often, insurance companies will send out emergency response teams to a devastated area and set up temporary shop outside local supermarkets or strip centers, Whittle says. These representatives may issue checks or debit cards immediately, for food and housing.

A claims adjuster will be sent to your home to assess the damage. The insurance adjuster will ask for proof of lost items (your inventory list) and a description of the event (tornado) signed by you. The adjuster will investigate the validity of your claim, come up with the replacement cost and issue payment. How long the process takes depends on the complexity of the claim, Whittle says.



Fri Sep 29 2017 at 10:06 am -0400
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration's ability to win over the U.S. Supreme Court will be put to the test when the nine justices begin their new term on Monday with major cases awaiting on voting rights, religious liberty, union funding and class-action suits.
 
Fri Sep 29 2017 at 10:25 am -0400
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (Reuters) - The mayor of the capital of Puerto Rico hit back on Friday at the comments of a top U.S. official who said federal efforts to help the territory recover from the devastation of Hurricane Maria is "a good news story."
 
Fri Sep 29 2017 at 10:44 am -0400
NEW YORK (Reuters) - When reporters descended on upstate New York to ask about a stunning prison break in 2015, state police spokesman Major Charles Guess took their questions.
 
Thu Sep 28 2017 at 3:04 pm -0400
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Two U.S. senators from both parties are close to finalizing a bipartisan deal to shore up the health insurance exchanges created under Obamacare, the chamber's top Democrat said on Thursday.
 
Thu Sep 28 2017 at 7:18 pm -0400
CHICAGO (Reuters) - Illinois Republican Governor Bruce Rauner signed a controversial bill into law on Thursday to expand state-funded coverage of abortions for low-income residents on Medicaid and state employees.
 Content copyright 2017. Hindsight Information Collections. All rights reserved.


Will your home insurance take on a tornado?

Insurance » Tornadoes » Will Your Home Insurance Take On A Tornado?

It seems to appear out of nowhere and is gone within minutes, but in that short time a tornado can devastate a home. The vital question is: Can your home insurance withstand its winds?


About 1,000 tornadoes touch down in the U.S. in an average year, causing billions of dollars in insured losses, according to the Insurance Information Institute. Last year, these monster storms -- which can wipe out whole neighborhoods and small towns -- were the costliest type of natural disaster in the country for insurers, according to Munich Re, a company that insures insurance companies.

Here are five steps for assessing your insurance needs in the face of tornadoes.

1. Know your coverage

Unlike floods or earthquakes, tornadoes don't require a special type of insurance. A basic homeowners policy should cover the damage inflicted by a tornado, whether it's from wind or rain, says Christopher Hackett, director of personal lines policy at the Property Casualty Insurers Association of America.

Still, homeowners concerned about tornadoes should make sure their policies match their financial needs, he says.

For example, a policy with a higher deductible likely will translate into lower premiums, but you will end up paying more out of your own pocket if a tornado damages or destroys your house, Hackett says. Make sure you can cover the deductible. Otherwise, consider a higher premium with a smaller deductible.

It's also important to know if you have a replacement cost policy, which replaces the damage to the home with materials that are similar in quality and kind. The alternative is a cash-value policy, which accounts for depreciation and probably won't pay as much, Hackett says.


2. Take inventory

Of course, homeowners insurance covers more than just the structure. The policies cover what's on the inside, too.

If your insurance replaced "just a home (but) no bed, it's not a home," notes Jim Whittle, the assistant general counsel and chief claims counsel at the American Insurance Association.

Make a list of what you have, to ensure your possessions are covered adequately. Include brand names, when you bought each item and approximately how much you paid. Include receipts when possible, especially for more expensive belongings such as electronics and appliances.

Create a photo log of your possessions or record what you have on video. A detailed list will help you determine how much coverage you need and make it easier to file a claim after a tornado.

Store these records in a secure place, such as a safe deposit box at a bank or in a lock box in whatever room you designate as your safe room.

3. Consider your valuables and car

Your home insurance will cover personal property up to a limit. If you own valuable items such as stamp or coin collections, fine art, expensive photography equipment or jewelry, consider a rider on your policy to increase coverage, Hackett recommends. These items may require an appraisal before a rider is granted.

If your car is damaged while parked in the garage, it may or may not be covered by homeowners insurance, says Whittle. Still, the comprehensive portion of an auto policy should take care of any damage from a tornado's wind or hail, and cover your vehicle against flooding, vandalism, and theft during or after a storm, he says. (A cautionary note: Not all states require comprehensive coverage for auto insurance, so make sure you have it.)

4. Don't forget about living expenses

Another consideration is where your family is going to live and how you will eat while your home is being repaired (or rebuilt) after a tornado. Instead of crashing on a friend's couch in the basement, check if your homeowners insurance will pay for additional living expenses, Hackett says.

This type of coverage helps cover the cost of staying in a hotel or paying rent for temporary housing. It can even cover meal expenses while your family is displaced.

5. What to do in the aftermath

After making sure your family is safe, get in touch with your insurer. You should have contact information for your homeowners insurance company and agent in a safe place with your inventory of possessions.

Often, insurance companies will send out emergency response teams to a devastated area and set up temporary shop outside local supermarkets or strip centers, Whittle says. These representatives may issue checks or debit cards immediately, for food and housing.

A claims adjuster will be sent to your home to assess the damage. The insurance adjuster will ask for proof of lost items (your inventory list) and a description of the event (tornado) signed by you. The adjuster will investigate the validity of your claim, come up with the replacement cost and issue payment. How long the process takes depends on the complexity of the claim, Whittle says.


                                                                                                                   
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